TOP-16 of the most high-tech types of firearms

Military men around the world create and test futuristic weapons that look like something from the James Bond movies. From weapons capable of firing underwater to pistols equipped with a fingerprint recognition system, businessinsider.com has prepared a list of the most unusual weapons that are being developed right now. 16. CornerShot rifles are known for their unusual ability to shoot around the corner. CornerShot can be used as a semi-automatic rifle or grenade launcher.
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DIY -- 24 method how to make your own hand sanitizer

Liquid hand sanitizers-mostly alcohol-based gels-have experienced an explosion in popularity over the last 10 years. If you’ve recently traveled by plane or set foot in a classroom in the US, chances are you’ve seen hand sanitizers in use. Hand sanitizers do not act as a substitute for a comprehensive handwashing process. Alternatively, they are thought to bring some of the advantages of handwashing to customers when handwashing is not practical.
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Trump vs Fauci: President and doctor spar over unproven drug

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an extraordinary exchange, President Donald Trump and the government’s top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, publicly sparred Friday on whether a malaria drug would work to treat people with coronavirus disease. The scene played out on national television during the daily White House briefing on the outbreak. Anxious for answers, Americans heard conflicting ones from a just-the-facts scientist and a president who operates on gut instinct.
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US virus testing faces new headwind: Lab supply shortages

WASHINGTON (AP) — First, some of the coronavirus tests didn’t work. Then there weren’t enough to go around. Now, just as the federal government tries to ramp up nationwide screening, laboratory workers are warning of a new roadblock: dire shortages of testing supplies. The shortages are the latest stumble in a botched effort to track the spread of coronavirus that has left the U.S. weeks behind many other developed countries. Dwindling supplies include both chemical components and basic swabs needed to collect patient samples.
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Italy's virus epicenter grapples with huge toll, some hidden

BERGAMO, Italy (AP) — The priest gave a final benediction. There were no flowers, no embraces. Francesca Steffanoni and her mother hurried away from Bergamo’s main cemetery, their furtive farewell lasting no more than 5 minutes. Bergamo is the epicenter of the hardest-hit province of Italy’s hardest-hit region, Lombardy, the site of hundreds of coronavirus deaths. Families here are deprived of a bedside farewell with virus-stricken loved ones, or even a traditional funeral, and the cemetery is so overwhelmed by the number of dead that military trucks transported 65 bodies to a neighboring region for cremation this week.
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Asian stocks rise after Wall Street advance on aid hopes

BEIJING (AP) — Asian stock markets rose Friday after Wall Street gained on hopes government and central bank action can shield the world economy from a looming recession caused by the coronavirus. Benchmarks in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Australia and Southeast Asia advanced. Tokyo was closed for a holiday. Oil gained again a day after U.S. benchmark crude soared by a record 23%. Investors were encouraged after seeing more steps by the Federal Reserve and other central banks and governments to support credit markets and the economy.
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Joe Biden, nominee-in-waiting. And waiting. And waiting.

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the three weeks since his blowout win in the South Carolina primary, Joe Biden has emerged as the Democratic presidential nominee-in-waiting. But, amid the uncertainty of the coronavirus pandemic, put the emphasis on waiting. Biden holds an essentially insurmountable delegate lead over his last remaining rival, Bernie Sanders, yet the Vermont senator remains in the race. And with several states delaying their primaries to avoid the spread of the COVID-19 virus, Biden can’t reach the required majority of pledged convention delegates until May or June.
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Europeans sing health workers' praises nightly from windows

PARIS (AP) — At a time of isolation, people in many European cities hit hard by the new coronavirus are taking at least a minute each night to come together in gratitude. They stand at open windows or on balconies in Rome, Madrid, Paris, Athens and Amsterdam, singing, cheering and applauding even though they know their intended audience is too busy to listen. The adulation is for the doctors, nurses and other health care workers putting themselves at risk on the front lines of the pandemic that is forcing most residents to stay home.
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Gabbard ends long-shot 2020 bid, throws support to Biden

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard suspended her presidential campaign on Thursday, ending a long-shot effort that saw her feuding with Hillary Clinton and raising fears among Democrats that she would mount a third-party 2020 bid. In an email and a video posted to Twitter, Gabbard offered her full support to former Vice President Joe Biden, saying “it’s clear that Democratic primary voters have chosen” him to take on President Donald Trump in November.
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Israel's Netanyahu accused of exploiting virus crisis

JERUSALEM (AP) — With the Israeli government enacting a series of emergency measures to stem the spread of the new coronavirus, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is facing growing accusations that he is exploiting the crisis to entrench himself in power and undermining the country’s democratic foundations. Amid a wave of sweeping restrictions that have put Israel in near shutdown mode, Netanyahu has managed to postpone his own pending criminal trial, authorize unprecedented electronic surveillance of Israeli citizens and block parliament from pressing ahead with legislation aimed at pushing him from office.
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